The Sparrow, Mary Doria Russell

Shannon:

My review of The Sparrow, posted on SF Mistressworks.

Originally posted on SF Mistressworks:

The SparrowThe Sparrow, Mary Doria Russell (1996)
Review by Shannon Turlington

It’s hard to describe the exhilarating sense of emotion I felt while reading this book. I don’t consider myself a religious person, and this book is unquestionably about religion and our relationship with God. I am a spiritual seeker, though, and I found this novel to be one of the most meaningful examinations of our purpose as humans that I have ever read. It is not an easy read, and it offers no easy answers. But despite its horrors – and some truly horrific things happen in this story – it is a beautiful, life-affirming read.

I don’t want to reveal too much of the plot, because part of the joy of reading The Sparrow lies in discovering it. Russell parcels out the story in bits and pieces, to prepare the reader for what’s coming. So, just a bare-bones summary…

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Reading this past quarter…

Here are the most interesting books I’ve read over the past 3 months. Click the cover for the full review.

The Bell JarThe Woman UpstairsWeThe SundialThe Robber BrideThe Big SleepThe Office of MercyThe Golem and the JinniThe Female ManChina Mountain Zhang

Worlds of Exile and Illusion, Ursula K Le Guin

Shannon:

SF Mistressworks reposted my review of Worlds of Exile and Illusion, an omnibus of three of Ursula K. Le Guin’s early novels.

Originally posted on SF Mistressworks:

worldsofexileWorlds of Exile and Illusion, Ursula K Le Guin (1996)
Review by Shannon Turlington

How can you tell the legend from the fact on these worlds that lie so many years away? – planets without names, called by their people simply The World, planets without history, where the past is a matter of myth, and a returning explorer finds his own doings of a few years back have become the gestures of a god.

Three early novels of the Hainish Cycle collected in one volume.

The science fiction novels of Ursula K Le Guin, often collectively called the “Hainish Cycle,” are not intended to be a series in the conventional sense. They are meant to stand alone and be read that way. But collecting three of her earliest novels into one volume gives the reader the opportunity to read these as a series, revealing connecting themes and making for a…

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