My Review of Lilith’s Brood by Octavia E Butler on SF Mistressworks

Shannon:

SF Mistressworks has kindly republished my review of Lilith’s Brood by Octavia Butler. Go check it out!

Originally posted on SF Mistressworks:

lillith Lilith’s Brood (Dawn, Adulthood Rites and Imago), Octavia E Butler (1989)
Review by Shannon Turlington

Octavia Butler’s Xenogenesis novels were first compiled into one volume in 1989, but that compilation is now out of print. As with Seed to Harvest, Grand Central Publishing has reissued the compilation in an attractive trade paperback to capture new readers. And I’m glad they did, because I probably wouldn’t have read these books otherwise.

When I finished Lilith’s Brood, I actually wasn’t sure whether I liked it or not, but I thought about it a great deal, which I think is a sign of a book worth reading. The underlying theme disturbed me, partly because I didn’t find much hope in it, partly because I found myself agreeing with the series’ assessment: that humankind is fated by our own biology to destroy ourselves.

Lilith’s Brood includes three novels: Dawn, Adulthood Rites

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My Little Free Library project…

I’m going to be sponsoring a Little Free Library in our neighborhood. “Take a book, return a book.” I enjoy looking at the pictures of all the little free libraries people have built. Here’s one repurposing a pay phone booth, which is extinct now, of course.

Littel Free Library in a pay phone

It would be nice to build the equivalent of a Little Free Library using e-books, but giving the restrictions placed upon them by publishers, that doesn’t seem likely. Fortunately, paper books will be with us for a long time. Just because I have and enjoy a Kindle doesn’t stop me from buying paper books. My urge to share books, as well as to support community meeting places like our local bookstore, also keeps me buying them.

My review of Into the Forest by Jean Hegland on SF Mistressworks

Shannon:

My review of the apocalyptic novel Into the Forest by Jean Hegland, posted on SF Mistressworks.

Originally posted on SF Mistressworks:

intotheforest Into the Forest, Jean Hegland (1996)
Review by Shannon Turlington

“People have been around for at least 100,000 years. And how long have we had electricity?”
“Well, Edison invented the incandescent lamp in 1879.”
“See? All this,” and she swung her arm to encircle the rooms of the only house I’d ever know, “was only a fugue state.” She pointed to the blackness framed by the open door. “Our real lives are out there.”

Two teenage daughters become stranded in their rural California home at the edge of a large, wild forest after the unexplained collapse of society and the accidental death of their father; gradually, the girls accept the reality of their situation and learn how to survive off the forest, which is the only resource they have in abundance.

This book revealed itself slowly, and it took me quite a while to really understand what it was all…

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Ah, nostalgia! Revisiting childhood reads…

Over the past couple of years, I’ve been revisiting favorite authors from my childhood, just rereading one or two of their best novels. I read a lot of mysteries back then, but I’ve fallen off in my mystery reading since. First, I reread some Agatha Christies: And Then There Were None and The Murder of Roger Ackroyd. She was one of my favorite authors back then, and if I hadn’t read all of her books, I came pretty close. I think it’s becoming obvious that I did little other than read as a child. Well, I was that kind of kid.

My most recent reread was Dorothy L. Sayers’ Gaudy NightSuch an excellent book, and so much more rewarding to read now. Christie’s books are like bonbons, delicious and worth gobbling, but Sayers presents a more satisfying entree that needs to be savored.

Next, I’m thinking about revisiting Josephine Tey and P.D. James. Also, perhaps Martha Grimes and Ruth Rendell. I’m feeling a bit nostalgic about all of these terrific ladies who wrote/write detective novels.

(Most links go to LibraryThing, except the link to Gaudy Night, which goes to the full review on my book-journaling blog.)

Everyday Drinking by Kingsley Amis–Thoughts

Kingsley AmisIt seems like many of us avid readers have a fascination with what, and how much, some of our favorite authors could drink. There have been some wonderful love letters written to alcohol by some of our greatest literary talents.

Kingsley Amis was a prodigious drinker. We might almost call him a professional. His words on drinking have been gathered up in a little book: Everyday Drinking.

This is not a book for reading straight through as much as tippling from at odd times. But if you are at all fond of alcohol, it is a must-read.

There are actually three short books in this volume. The first, and best, section is Amis’s treatise on drink. It is quite funny, and some practical tips are scattered here and there. The second section reprints Amis’s newspaper columns on the subject of drink, and there is some repetition here. The final section contains several alcohol-related quizzes, which might be fun after having a few.

Keep this book by your bar, and remember to nip from it every now and then. It’s probably the only book on the subject you’ll need.

I guess these days we’re too health-conscious to drink like the masters did. Too many calories! The jury is out on whether this is a good thing for literature. But it sure doesn’t seem like being a writer is as much fun.