On mothers writing about sex…

Interesting post on BuzzFeed of all places: Madonnas And Whores: On Mothers Writing About Sex.

I don’t tend to think of the authors I’m reading as anything but “authors.” That is, I don’t wonder if they are parents or assign them that designation or any other. I do think it’s odd how many people get fiction confused with real life, as if the author cannot write about anything that she hasn’t personally experienced.

Books by women: A reading list

In a recent post, I discussed trying to read books written by women. This led me to consider which women authors I would recommend, and I came up with a list of books by women that I think are entertaining and enlightening reads. Of course, I am not the only person to have come up with such a list, and if you are so inclined, you can find 50, 100, or even 500 more books by women to fill up your “to read” shelf.

Here is my list (my absolute favorite books are starred and my favorite women authors are bolded):

  • Kate Atkinson: Life After Life
  • Margaret Atwood: Cat’s Eye; The Handmaid’s Tale*; Oryx and Crake*
  • Jane Austen: Emma; Persuasion; Pride and Prejudice*
  • Charlotte Bronte: Jane Eyre*
  • Octavia Butler: Lilith’s Brood*; Parable of the Sower*; Parable of the Talents
  • Kate Chopin: The Awakening
  • Daphne du Maurier: Rebecca*
  • Jean Hegland: Into the Forest
  • Patricia Highsmith: The Talented Mr. Ripley
  • Shirley Jackson: The Haunting of Hill House*; The Sundial*; We Have Always Lived in the Castle*
  • P.D. James: The Children of Men*
  • Nancy Kress: Beggars in Spain
  • Madeleine L’Engle: A Wrinkle in Time
  • Anne Lamott: Bird by Bird
  • Ursula K. Le Guin: Always Coming Home*; The Dispossessed; The Lathe of Heaven; The Left Hand of Darkness*; The Unreal and the Real; The Word for World Is Forest
  • Harper Lee: To Kill a Mockingbird*
  • Erin Morgenstern: The Night Circus*
  • Audrey Niffenegger: The Time Traveler’s Wife
  • Flannery O’Connor: A Good Man Is Hard to Find and Other Stories*
  • Sylvia Plath: The Bell Jar
  • E. Annie Proulx: The Shipping News
  • Mary Doria Russell: Children of God; The Sparrow*
  • Dorothy L. Sayers: Gaudy Night*
  • Sheri S. Tepper: Grass
  • Jo Walton: Among Others
  • Kate Wilhelm: Where Late the Sweet Birds Sang
  • Connie Willis: To Say Nothing of the Dog*
  • M.K. Wren: A Gift Upon the Shore*

How to consciously read books written by women…

Before I started journaling my reading, in 2001, I just read whatever caught my eye at the bookstore without any sort of plan whatsoever. Over the decade since I started journaling, I’ve gradually become more purposeful in my reading, and if I look back over my journals (now on LibraryThing), I can see a steady improvement in the books I choose to read reflected in higher ratings and fewer abandoned books. 

At the beginning of the year, I did an exercise where I identified my top 10 favorite books of all time. I noticed that 7 out of 10 books were written by women (and of the 3 on my list written by men, one of those men was gay), but in my general reading, I’m still reading 2 books by men for every 1 book by a woman, according to LibraryThing stats. I decided to get even more purposeful in my reading and read mostly women, choosing books that are similar to my top 7 favorite books/authors. I still have a lot of unplanned reads, but the deliberate planning has been helping me discover new-to-me authors and break out of my ruts. This month, for instance, I’m reading 5 sci-fi/fantasy books all by women I have never read before.

My goals to stretch even further would be to read more women of color and more authors from countries other than the US/Canada/Britain. I would also like to read more gay authors and more authors of color generally. As a former English major, I find that I have about had my fill of the white male voice, even though there are many white male authors whose books I enjoy. But I want to hear from some other voices and open up my world even more.

For further reading:

The Snow Queen, Joan D Vinge

Shannon:

SF Mistressworks republished my review of The Snow Queen.

Originally posted on SF Mistressworks:

snowqueenThe Snow Queen, Joan D Vinge (1980)
Review by Shannon Turlington

The Snow Queen is an epic story set on a distant planet, about the fall of one queen and the rise of another. The novel is based on the fairy tale by Hans Christian Anderson and tackles such weighty themes as immortality and the power of knowledge.

The strength of this novel lies in its world building. The planet of Tiamat is a fully realized world, an ocean-covered planet orbiting twin suns. Two tribes live there: the sea-going, island-dwelling Summers, characterized by a fear of technology and a superstitious worship of their sea goddess, the Lady; and the Winters, who live in the Northern regions and the shell-shaped city of Carbuncle, embrace technology and freely trade with the Offworlders.

Tiamat’s culture and history are shaped by the oddities of its planetary and solar system orbits. Every 150 years, it…

View original 553 more words

Why You Hate Work – NYTimes.com

Does this sound familiar?

Even if you’re lucky enough to have a job, you’re probably not very excited to get to the office in the morning, you don’t feel much appreciated while you’re there, you find it difficult to get your most important work accomplished, amid all the distractions, and you don’t believe that what you’re doing makes much of a difference anyway.

This terrific article not only will explain Why You Hate Work, but it provides practical suggestions to improve work. Here’s the key learning:

Employees are vastly more satisfied and productive, it turns out, when four of their core needs are met: physical, through opportunities to regularly renew and recharge at work; emotional, by feeling valued and appreciated for their contributions; mental, when they have the opportunity to focus in an absorbed way on their most important tasks and define when and where they get their work done; and spiritual, by doing more of what they do best and enjoy most, and by feeling connected to a higher purpose at work.